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  #11  
Old 06-22-2012
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Dag-Sabot Dag-Sabot is offline
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if you have three friends and three boats you can make your own.
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  #12  
Old 06-22-2012
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Schnick Schnick is offline
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At certain clubs, it seems like only the (really) old people come out to vote, so only the (really) old people's (really) old friends tend to get elected to the executive, so the club's direction is usually guided by the wants of people who have retired from racing and are a bit out of touch with the younger members.

This is sort of like the situation with our whole democracy. By the time you figure it out, you're one of the old people.

"Bet on self-interest, it's always running" - Dennis Conner
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  #13  
Old 06-22-2012
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Shawmac, does that mean I can get a sweet deal joining your club?? ;-)
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  #14  
Old 06-22-2012
ShawMac ShawMac is offline
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Always a sweet deal joining SYC. Have you relocated yet? You can get your moorage initiation hours in volunteering for SOAR :P
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  #15  
Old 06-22-2012
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Quote:
Consider the 60+ generation many have quite nice boats. Say i did not have a boat and i wanted to get involved with a local yacht club and go out with someone who had a boat to learn to sail with my family. I have a 7 year old child. She is a pretty good kid but as kids are she is inquisitive and mischevious and accidents happen. How many older people do you think would be willing to open up their boat to allow three passengers on board one of whom might touch things they are not supossed to or break something or spill food and or drink on the nice white upolstery? I doubt many would be willing to allow that sort of thing. Even without that factor crewing in a race could be a challenge with younger children as well they tend to get in the way. Which all comes back to having boating and especially sailing be accessable to young families. It is not an easy thing to do these days everything is expensive and children only drive up that cost.
You are correct in that it would be tough to find alot of sailors who would welcome a family of complete strangers on board their boat, however, once you have developed a friendship with those people you might find it is a different story. The same goes for racing; adults don't have too much trouble finding a boat to go out racing on. It is definitely a tougher sell if you have a kid in tow. Again, that would likely change once you got to know the skipper. On the other hand, yacht clubs do offer very good junior sailing programs that allow the kids to learn to sail with their peers, and the reality is that they will probably have more fun sailing with other kids in dinghies than going out on keelboats with a bunch of "old people"! In many cases you don't have to be club members to participate in the programs.

I think the idea that the clubs are full of nothing but 60+ members is not entirely correct. The 2 clubs I am involved in have plenty of young families who actively sail. While it is true that many of those families are 2nd generation members, that is not always the case. A good example is at RVYC where there are several annual group cruises that are very popular with families. The cruise our family is doing, Dog Days South, has 16 boats registered, (and 3 more on a waiting list) with over 30 kids under 10 years old spending a week cruising the gulf islands as a group. While there are a few very nice, very expensive yachts participating, the vast majority of boats are far more modest than you might expect. Some members even charter boats for the event because they don't own a cruisable boat. The kids always have an amazing time, and make lifelong memories and friendships on those trips.

I am one of those people who spent more on a yacht club membership than my boat is worth. I see it as a long term investment into a lifestyle we enjoy. We are not rich by any stretch of the imagination, and with financing options it is no different than making payments on a car for 5 years, except the membership is much more enduring than an old car!
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  #16  
Old 06-22-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnick View Post
At certain clubs, it seems like only the (really) old people come out to vote, so only the (really) old people's (really) old friends tend to get elected to the executive, so the club's direction is usually guided by the wants of people who have retired from racing and are a bit out of touch with the younger members.

This is sort of like the situation with our whole democracy. By the time you figure it out, you're one of the old people.

"Bet on self-interest, it's always running" - Dennis Conner
Yes that can be a problem, but I think the bigger problem is the complacency. The vast majority of club members just can't be bothered to get involved, and are content to sit back and let a small group do all the work, while they just reap the benefits of all that work, and bitch about decisions they don't agree with. I served several terms on the Executive at DCYC when I was younger, and I can tell you it is alot of thankless work. Now my focus is on my family, but I am sure once my son is older, and doesn't want anything to do with me, I will get involved again. Of course by that time I guess I will be one of the "really old guys" eh?

I don't think the problem is that young members don't vote as much as young members don't put themselves up for the positions! Schnick, if you run for an executive position, I promise I will vote for you!
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  #17  
Old 06-22-2012
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This reminds me of something Tom Schnackenberg talked about years ago when discussing how the cost of boat ownership was discouraging people from buying boats, and he was specifically talking about Vancouver. He thought that was a load of rubbish. It came down to a matter of priorities He then compared the different attitudes of people in New Zealand compared with those in Vancouver (he attended grad school in Comp Sci at UBC in the late 70s, or thereabout, so he was familiar with the local sailing community).

Anyways, he thought one of the differences was that in New Zealand, if someone had $400,000 (or was capable of borrowing it), they would tend to spend $200,000 on a modest house and $200,000 on a boat, whereas in Vancouver, people would spend the entire $400,000 on purchasing as big a house as possible. It was all a matter of priorities.
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  #18  
Old 06-22-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guar View Post
This reminds me of something Tom Schnackenberg talked about years ago when discussing how the cost of boat ownership was discouraging people from buying boats, and he was specifically talking about Vancouver. He thought that was a load of rubbish. It came down to a matter of priorities He then compared the different attitudes of people in New Zealand compared with those in Vancouver (he attended grad school in Comp Sci at UBC in the late 70s, or thereabout, so he was familiar with the local sailing community).

Anyways, he thought one of the differences was that in New Zealand, if someone had $400,000 (or was capable of borrowing it), they would tend to spend $200,000 on a modest house and $200,000 on a boat, whereas in Vancouver, people would spend the entire $400,000 on purchasing as big a house as possible. It was all a matter of priorities.
I think priorities have something to do with it. If you really want the boating lifestyle but don't make a ton of money there are still plenty of affordable boats out there. Even walking the docks at RVYC there are plenty of 4KSBs around! Sure, it is out of reach for a single parent working for minimum wage, but any middle class family could do it if they really wanted to.

Of course they might have a hard time finding moorage...
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  #19  
Old 06-22-2012
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Um. I would hazard to say that $400,000 in Vancouver won't buy you much more than a 1 bedroom apartment......a "house" would be a stretch, which I know is not the situation in NZ.
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  #20  
Old 06-22-2012
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Yeah I think it is safe to say that a greater portion of the pie must go to the home, hence the number of more affordable boats that are out there. Although there seems to be no shortage of people that can afford the best of both!
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