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  #11  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krikkitman View Post
Which takes us back to my initial comment
This doesn't really answer the question.

You allude that sailing a loaded caravan is the way forward, but at the same time put a lot of effort into the racing side: new sails, crew practice, consistent participation, bottom jobs, etc.

There are other aspects of boat preparation and boat handling that are just as important.

One is getting as much weight off the boat as possible. If you don't have space at home, why not spend 10 minutes to offload it on the dock. We don't bring anything that is not required by rules or needed to race the boat.

No one is saying to not cruise your boat, but why race with all that crap onboard?
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  #12  
Old 05-04-2015
ShawMac ShawMac is offline
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We launch and douse through the fore-hatch when fully crewed for buoy racing. Distance we may use the companion way for dousing and re-pack unless there is going to be a lot of ups and downs in light variable winds.

Double-handed with a lot of ups and downs we used the companion way with success, but there is only two of us. Singlehanded is a lot of fun when dousing in 25-30 and the kite closes the halyard cleat as it drags into the cockpit and you can't reach it

We never used the forehatch on Red Heather (Olson 40). Launches were from the bag and all douses were through the main slot to help keep that square footage under control.
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  #13  
Old 05-04-2015
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Krikkitman Krikkitman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultraman View Post
This doesn't really answer the question … why race with all that crap onboard?
We tried one series where we stripped the boat out pretty thoroughly. It didn't make a whit of difference on the race course, but it made going cruising a major pain in the ass and reduced my enjoyment of the boat considerably. Call me misguided, but I like sitting below in comfort and not having to lug every single thing I own back and forth to the boat every time I go cruising (which can be every weekend during portions of the season).

I do try to get some of the really big heavy things (the cabin table, for starters) out when I can and leave it in our van. And for the record, we're not allowed to leave stuff on the docks at FCHA.

Anyhow, let's be generous and assume that I have 250 lbs of "crap" (what I call "creature comforts") aboard the boat. That's like one big crewmember. To compensate, I keep my own weight under 160 and I've told my foredeck he's not allowed to crack 150.

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Originally Posted by Schnick View Post
… Sorry Simon, but that was one of my biggest pet peeves every time I've sailed on Krikkit. Companionway douses in a buoy race drive me nuts. The kite should go down the fore hatch, all three corners should STAY ATTACHED for the next set, and off you go….
For single-race evening racing, I really don't think it's that big of a deal (especially for a boat running a furling headsail) provided you're practiced and have a system that works. We've got it down to a decent art most of the time these days.

When you get into the "five twice-around races" format of a major regatta weekend, however, I do get your point. The bowman can be pretty wrung-out by the end of it, and yeah, Krikkit has been doing more of these regatta weekends than I originally envisioned. So it's not impossible that one day I might try putting together some sort of hatch liner to make it conceivable to hatch launch without shredding the chute, and see how that works in fair weather.

But there are still other priorities that need to come first, and even if I do rig up such a system, if it's pissing with rain as badly as it was the second day of the opener, then screw that, I'm going back to plan A.
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  #14  
Old 05-04-2015
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Wraith Wraith is online now
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On the CM1200, we do the first launch of a kite out of the bag, then douse down the hatch, then subsequent hoists out of the hatch. We have 3 carabiners on bungees so we can have 3 kites to choose from for a hoist out of the hatch if needed.

In heavy winds or short handed will do a letter slot.

On the schock 35, I had a mesh bag that slid into tracks under the hatch, worked fine for one kite.
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  #15  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krikkitman View Post
For single-race evening racing, I really don't think it's that big of a deal (especially for a boat running a furling headsail) provided you're practiced and have a system that works. We've got it down to a decent art most of the time these days.

It's less about the quickness of the drop and more about having someone off the rail during the upwind leg to repack. I would think this is especially important on a tippy canoe like Krikkit.
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  #16  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven View Post
On the schock 35, I had a mesh bag that slid into tracks under the hatch, worked fine for one kite.
That's right, I vaguely remember that now. Very Martin 242ish!

I guess that's another possible system to try out some day.

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Originally Posted by Schnick View Post
It's less about the quickness of the drop and more about having someone off the rail during the upwind leg to repack. I would think this is especially important on a tippy canoe like Krikkit.
I can't really argue that one too much. Pack quickly, and on the high side!

I would point out though that on a narrow boat like Krikkit, weight on the rail is actually less effective (and likely therefore less critical) than on a flying saucer like Excalibur, simply because on Krikkit the rail weight is insufficiently far out from the centreline (especially once you heel over a bit).

I suspect this is one reason Krikkit is fairly effective when short-handed or single-handed -- it doesn't really tip that much more with just me aboard than with me and four people on the rail. It's just pretty tippy up to about 20 degrees regardless, and then the keel finally starts to get out enough to generate righting moment. The straight, narrow hull shape means it doesn't much care about the heel, provided you don't press on so much canvas that you start to slide off sideways. Indeed, Bill Abbott Jr.'s advice to me was "Don't be afraid to sail it on it's ear."

Edit: None of this is to say that rail meat isn't helpful on Krikkit, because it is. Just that it's not neccesarily more important than on a wider, stiffer boat.
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  #17  
Old 05-04-2015
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Companionway....Been there, done that, hated it. Especially with the #1 up. First hoist is a bag on the rail, subsequent hoists from the forward hatch. Quick and easy. And if it screws up, well who doesn't love giving the bowman a hard time.
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  #18  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krikkitman View Post

I would point out though that on a narrow boat like Krikkit, weight on the rail is actually less effective (and likely therefore less critical) than on a flying saucer like Excalibur, simply because on Krikkit the rail weight is insufficiently far out from the centreline (especially once you heel over a bit).
OK then take two Abbot 36es and have one crew hike, one crew not, which one will be faster?
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  #19  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnick View Post
OK then take two Abbot 36es and have one crew hike, one crew not, which one will be faster?
Did you post this before or after my edit? Because yes, rail meat is helpful and useful aboard Krikkit, just not necessarily any more so than on any other boat. And possibly less so??

I wonder if henryr has any thoughts on this, since we're treading awfully close to actual naval architect territory here ...
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  #20  
Old 05-04-2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schnick View Post
OK then take two Abbot 36es and have one crew hike, one crew not, which one will be faster?
The one with the deeper keel and taller rig.
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